Run, Walk and Hike Pain Free with These Exercises

Running creates impact forces of up to 10 times your body weight! When your body is not stacked in a strong, aligned posture against the forces of gravity and ground reaction, guess what? Your body will suffer! With each foot strike, you hit the ground. Then,  the ground hits you back with an equal but opposite force. In essence, if there is a weak link in your body, such as in your ankle, knee, low back, you could have pain and injury.

Walking and hiking, too, have impact issues. In these activities, the impact is less. However, the pain and injury from misalignments, muscle imbalances and faulty foot mechanics can be the same. So, what can you do to combat this? Perform the following posture exercises (provided by the Egoscue® Portland Clinic) before and after your next workout! They will keep you running, walking and hiking pain free.

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About the Author

Jessica

Jessica uses an integrative approach to help you overcome chronic pain. She believes in treating the whole person utilizing the biopsychosocial approach to healing. Her offerings include posture therapy, online exercise classes, pain science education, and individual or group wellness coaching. She is certified by the Postural Restoration Institute® (PRI), Egoscue University®, National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), American Council on Exercise (ACE) and Wellcoaches.